Mo Yan and the ghosts of the 1979 war.

Mo Yan et Noël Dutrait

Mo Yan et Noël Dutrait

The Sino-Vietnamese war of February-March 1979 is forgotten despite the current tensions between the two countries, particularly with regard to the Spratley islands. A conflict evoked by Mo Yan in a short novel, “The Reunion of Companions in Arms” (1), a book of 1992 where Mo Yan shows once again the extent of his talent.

1- Mo Yan after the Nobel Prize:

 

The award of the Nobel … Lire la suite

Mo Yan and tribulations of a Nobel prize in Provence

MoYanA few days ago, Mo Yan, the Chinese novelist, Nobel Prize for Literature in 2012, was in Aix en Provence and for the fourth time. Why such a loyalty? Mo Yan has not forgotten the support  provided for years by a group of academics, translators, publishers, many of whom live in Provence in the south of France.

For the last five years he had not visited France, the country which has translated and published the … Lire la suite

Mo Yan, peut-on être à la fois Chinois et Prix Nobel? (2)

4/ En Occident, un intérêt limité:

Mo Yan NobelLa presse en France, n’a jamais montré beaucoup d’intérêt pour la littérature chinoise. Et pourtant c’est en France que Mo Yan est le plus publié (17 livres) du fait de la passion d’un petit groupe d’éditeurs et de traducteurs.

Mo Yan était peu connu dans le monde anglophone (9 livres publiés) mais paradoxalement la presse s’est beaucoup attachée à parler de cet écrivain et souvent avec des articles de … Lire la suite

Mo Yan, peut-on être à la fois Chinois et Prix Nobel? (1).

Mo Yan NobelLe prix Nobel de littérature a été attribué pour la première fois à un romancier chinois, Mo Yan. Evènement considérable dont se sont emparés les autorités de Pékin, les médias et les dissidents chinois du monde entier. Mo Yan a été jugé en fonction non de la qualité de ses livres, mais de positions politiques affichées ou supposées. Et pourtant son œuvre témoigne de l’indépendance et des capacités critiques d’un homme qui a été au Lire la suite

After the controversy over the Nobel and Mo Yan, why not read his books?

The award of the Nobel Prize for Literature to the Chinese writer Mo Yan led to an intense debate in the media, both in China and abroad.

Some have strongly regretted that a Communist Party member, vice-president of the Writers’ Union, is awarded the prize, others that Mo Yan is not a radical critique of the Chinese regime or an unreserved supporter of the dissidents.

Some articles even show that the methods of the Maoist … Lire la suite

Mo Yan: short stories by a Nobel prize.

When we speak of Mo Yan we specially mention his novels, his “long” novels which sometimes  and wrongly scare away some readers. But he wrote more than a hundred short stories and many “short” novels and novellas. As he mentions in his foreword to “Shifu …”, a collection of short stories published in the United States: “the stature of a writer can only be determined by the thought revealed in a work, not by its … Lire la suite

Mo Yan, the short story collection “The beauty riding a donkey…”

These last months, Mo Yan has been on the top of the news: the French publication of “Frogs” (1) followed a few days later by the award to this novel of the Mao Dun Prize (shared with four other writers) but a prize of 50,000 euros each.

Recently was published a collection of short stories with the evocative title: “The beauty riding a donkey on Chang’an Avenue” (2) with a book cover supposed to catch … Lire la suite

Mo Yan, “Frogs” and birth control policy.

Mo Yan is probably the greatest living writer of Chinese nationality. His latest novel, “Frogs”, is devoted to his aunt ,77 years old, who helped his birth – like 9983 other babies – and, half angel, half-demon, was also responsible for the local birth control policy. As such, she has performed thousands of abortions.

This novel, published in China in 2009, has led to many debates at a time when birth control is discussed openly … Lire la suite

“Change”, an autobiographical novella by Mo Yan.

Marketing fad or same age effect, during the last months, three autobiographical books  have been signed by the major writers of modern China: Yan Lianke, Yu Hua and Mo Yan.

The book byYan Lianke was a great success, which he did not expect. “The generation of my father” sold more than three hundred thousand copies. A book on the life of his village and his family and filial piety.

Yu Hua’s book is very … Lire la suite

“Frogs”, the latest novel by Mo Yan.

If you like Mo Yan, cheer up. As was told during his interview to Rue89 (30/08/2009), his novel “Frogs” has just been published in Beijing. “Frogs”, “Wa” in Chinese is pronounced like Nu Wa, goddess in Chinese mythology who created humanity, more over the frog in some provinces is the symbol of fertility.

As he said in an interview with China Daily (01/08/2010), it is a novel about his aunt, now 76 years old, who … Lire la suite

With a reincarnation, Mo Yan revisits the history of Communist China.

Originally published on Rue89- 30/8/2009.

 

 

A new novel by Chinese writer Mo Yan is an event: “The Harsh Law of Karma” (the french translation for ”Life and death are wearing me out”) is no exception. Through an animal reincarnation cascade, he leads the reader through the Chinese history of the last sixty years. During his visit to Paris in June 2009, Rue89 met Mo Yan, who had presented his latest work.

Landowner or servant, all Lire la suite

Mo Yan, the dictatorship of the Party and the market.

Originally published on Rue89, 24/6/2009.

The Chinese writer Mo Yan spent a week in France to present his books and his new novel to be releasd end of august.He met Rue89 with Bertrand Mialaret and Pierre Haski who had met him some years ago in Beijing. A meeting translated  by Chantal Chen- Andro, translator of many books by Mo Yan.

Mo Yan is 53 years old, he was born in a village near Gaomi in … Lire la suite

With a taste of meat, an allegorical novel by Mo Yan.

Originally published on Rue89, 24/11/2008 .

If you are a vegetarian, do not read this novel! You will live in modern China, the passion for meat, the slaughtering, processing, consumption of … Meat and alcohol as allegories of greed and modern debauchery.

 Boasting and lying, a “canon child”:
Two periods of time, a decade apart, are simultaneously used in the forty-one chapters, as the story telling by a child, Xiaotong Luo. As an adult, he

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